Being “better than” is not sufficient

Being “better than” is not sufficient

A Kaiser Health News article titled “Preexisting Conditions And Continuous Coverage: Key Elements Of GOP Bill” lays out the pitfalls that the Trumpcare snake oil salespeople are peddling. The following anecdote from the article is probative.

Before he was diagnosed with head and neck cancer in 2015, Anthony Kinsey often went without health insurance. He is a contract yer working for staffing agencies on short-term projects in the Washington, D.C., area, and sometimes the 90-day waiting period for coverage through a staffing agency proved longer than the duration of his project, if coverage was offered at all.

When Kinsey, now 57, learned he had cancer, he was able to sign up for a plan with a $629 monthly premium becae the agency he was working for offered group coverage that became effective immediately. The plan covered the $62,000 surgery to cut out the diseased bone and tissue on the left side of his face, as well as chemotherapy and radiation. His share of the treatment cost was $1,800.

If the American Health Care Act, which the Hoe recently passed, becomes , people like Kinsey who have health problems might not fare so well trying to buy insurance after a lapse.

The Republican bill would still require insurers to offer coverage to everyone, including people who have preexisting medical conditions, such as diabetes, asthma or even cancer. But it would allow states to opt out of the federal health ’s prohibition against charging sick people more than healthy ones. In those states, if people have a break in coverage of more than 63 days, insurers could charge them any price for coverage for approximately a year, effectively putting coverage out of reach for many sick people, analysts say. After a year, they would be charged a regular rate again.

And it gets much worse than that.

But some health policy analysts suggest that it’s not only people who have a gap in coverage who could be affected if a state seeks the health waiver. There could be consequences for anyone with a preexisting condition, even those who have maintained continuo insurance coverage. That’s becae the bill opens the door for insurers to set rates for people based on their health. For example, those without a health condition could be offered discounted premiums.

“If you have a preexisting condition, you’re going to be put into the block of biness with the sicker risk pool,” said Sabrina Corlette, a research professor at Georgetown University’s Center on Health Insurance Reforms.

And to combat the fallacies about high-risk pools, there is this.

State high-risk pools, which were available in 35 states before the ACA passed, have been widely criticized, however, as inadequate for people with expensive health care needs. Premiums were often extremely high, and there were frequently lifetime or annual limits on coverage. Some plans excluded coverage for as long as a year for the very conditions people needed insurance.

Source: We must not allow snake-oil marketing of Trumpcare to gain traction

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